Microsoft Decides

Last November, I speculated as to which, if any, eBook format Microsoft would support in Windows 8 tablets.

[Mistakenly, I also ranked Windows Media Center as "more central" to Microsoft's media consumption story. What? It's just one piece of the puzzle. Anyway. Always willing to admit mistakes.]

And now it looks like we have our answer. A $1.7 billion answer, by the way. Call it the Nook. From Barnes & Noble.

Microsoft agreed to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in Barnes & Noble’s Nook division on Monday, giving the bookstore chain stronger footing in the hotly contested electronic book market and creating an alliance that could intensify the fight over the future of digital reading.

ePub is now the official winner in the eBook format wars. Why do I say that? It’s the eBook format supported by nearly everyone. Apple. Sony. Adobe. Kobo Reader. Blackberry Playbook. Everyone except Amazon, which uses a proprietary variant of the Mobi format; to be kind, they also support a command-line ePub converter called KindleGen. Woo woo.

Oh wait… I’m missing something… Amazon owns 60% of the eBook market. And the U.S. Department of Justice apparently wants to help them get back to 90%. Winner: Mobi.

At any rate, here’s what Microsoft has decided:

  • On the eBook format side, Microsoft chooses ePub by investing in the Nook Division. It’s the primary eBook format for the Nook Color and that’s the future. Winner: ePub.
  • On the device side, the news release says the Nook Division will create a Nook Reader for Windows 8. That reader will likely read multiple format types (the Android-based Nook already does), with ePub prominent among them. Winner: ePub.

Scott Turow on the DOJ

I am not really a fan of Scott Turow’s books. Potboilers, mostly. But hey, I still like crime mysteries, so… There you go. Maybe it’s just a case of professional jealousy…

But count me among those who agree with his stance as Authors Guild President that the DOJ, in its investigation into price collusion between Apple and major publishers, “may be on the verge of killing real competition in order to save the appearance of competition.”

One set of numbers tells the tale:

  • Before Apple entered the eBook market, Amazon accounted for an estimated 90% of eBook sales.
  • After Apple entered the market, that figure dropped to an estimated 60%.

Yeah, I know he’s been criticized… Called a turncoat… It’s the same rhetoric over and over… In the three-legged stool represented by publishers, authors and consumers… The consumer is king. Yeah, we all like cheap. And while we’re at it, let’s kill the goose.